Festival

The following interview is the third in a series from writer and former Olympic alpine skier, Carrie Sheinberg who is profiling the filmmakers behind our 2017 festival films.   Editor’s Note: Since the completion of Madeleine Hunt Ehrlich’s film, the subject – Mckayla – succumbed to a sudden recurrence of cancer. Mckayla died on September 14, 2017.  We extended our deepest condolences to Mckayla's family and to Ms. Hunt Ehrlich. Years ago Madeleine Hunt Ehrlich was an upstart photographer working for independent artists and magazines around New York City. On a walkabout, in search of compelling imagery in the outer boroughs, Ehrlich happened upon a highly competitive cricket league. For the first time, she felt she needed more than just a single frame to capture the story she was seeing. “There was so much more that could be conveyed with a moving image,” Ehrlich remembered. She managed to find some funding and...

The following interview is the second in a series from writer and former Olympic alpine skier, Carrie Sheinberg who is profiling the filmmakers behind our 2017 films.   Filmmaker Veena Rao is fascinated by people and their everyday superpowers. Since graduating from NYU’s Tisch school of arts, Rao has documented an incredible variety of subjects: a gold polisher/ultra-marathon runner in Mumbai, an art-gallery-owner-by-day and aikido-master-by-night in New York City, an Iraqi refugee who recreates elaborate scenes in miniature replicas and a group of senior citizen synchronized swimmers in Harlem, New York, among others. What Rao loves is finding the extraordinary in the seemingly mundane. “There is something special inside everyone,” she says and Rao’s own superpower (if you will) is bringing translating that uniqueness to film for the rest of us to enjoy. WSFF: Is there something particularly intriguing about telling a sports story? VR: I think sports are something people are passionate...

The following interview is the first in a series from writer and former Olympic alpine skier, Carrie Sheinberg who is profiling the filmmakers behind our 2017 films.   Lisa Lax and Nancy Stern Winters, identical twin sisters and co-founders of Lookalike Productions have been telling sports stories for the past 30 years. They have earned16 Emmy awards, a Peabody Award, a Cine Golden Eagle Award and countless other accolades for their in-depth coverage of just about every sport imaginable. But somehow, despite their diverse storytelling resume, the most successful and revered coach in the history of college basketball had never passed through their viewfinder. So when long-time friend and television host Robin Roberts approached them with the idea to tell the story of legendary Tennessee Lady Vol’s coach Pat Summitt (who had just been diagnosed with early on-set Alzheimer’s Disease), the sister team wasted no time getting to work. The Lookalike Productions...

We’re thrilled to announce that Carrie Sheinberg has joined the Women Sports Film Festival team and will be profiling the filmmakers behind our 2017 films. As a writer and former Olympic alpine skier, Carrie knows the terrain of sports and storytelling firsthand. Keep an eye on our NEWS section for her interviews in the weeks ahead. But first, here's Carrie: As an Olympian I spent my career telling my own story; and since retiring in 1998, I’ve spent many of my professional years telling the stories of others – as a sports journalist for ESPN, SKI Magazine and NBC Olympic outlets. I was struck: on the playing field or on the hill, I had always been surrounded by women. But in the press pen it was literally a different story. The mixed zone (where athletes and press convened moments after a competition) was a nearly-all-male affair. The same was true in...

Welcome to the second annual Women Sports Film Festival. We are excited to be returning to Oakland with a full slate of new films celebrating the athletic achievement of women and girls from around the world. Our 2017 program includes seven feature length documentaries and 16 short films featuring female athletes from three continents participating in 18 sports.  The festival runs for from September 28 to October 1, 2017 at The New Parkway Theater. Festivities kick off with our Opening Night film, Girl Unbound, about Pakistani squash player and human rights activist, Maria Toorpakai, on Thursday, September 28. On Friday, September 29, we take a look back at the role Venus Williams played in the historic fight for equal prize money at Wimbledon, with Ava DuVernay's film, Venus Vs.  Saturday, September 30, starts with #EverydayActivism, a panel discussion with athletes using their platforms to create social change, including WNBA legend, Chamique...

The Women Sports Film Festival is committed to creating an inclusive and respectful gathering place to share stories and celebrate the achievements of female athletes from around the world. When selecting the dates for our second annual festival (September 28-30, 2017) we fell short in our commitment by scheduling the festival during Yom Kippur, the holiest of Jewish holidays. This was a careless oversight and we extend our sincere apologies to our friends and colleagues in the Jewish community for this mistake. In the short term, we have expanded the film festival by an additional day to include a full program of films and discussions on Sunday, October 1. In the long term, we promise to take extraordinary care when scheduling future film festivals. Thank you for your understanding as we move forward and do better. Susan Sullivan Founder, Women Sports Film Festival...

Written by Jennifer Matt, this post originally appeared in the Huffington Post on July 3, 2017 The Golden State Warriors play like girls and its the best thing to happen to the NBA in the last decade. I had stopped watching the NBA regular season because over the last decade the game had deteriorated into an individual sport of superstars playing isolation basketball (B-O-R-I-N-G). I use the term “deteriorated” purposefully because as a female fan, this performance — superstar gets ball, dribble, dribble, dribble, drive or shoot a jump shot, rinse and repeat — has no appeal to me. I don’t care to spend my free time watching nine players stand around while James Harden plays an individual game. Fan alert – it is way more exciting to see Patrick McCaw (that kid on the Warriors bench) dunk after three all-stars pass up contested shots. That’s a team sport. That’s entertaining. That’s fun...

In honor of Father's Day and the 45th anniversary of Title IX we are reposting our article about the important role father's play in supporting their daughters.  Check out our post on the Huffington Post blog,  The Importance of Fathers in Sports Gender Equality. Title IX is the landmark legislation passed in 1972 that prohibited discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally-funded education program or activity. Implementing the provisions of the new law was a slow and arduous process in which fathers emerged as the champions of enforcement on behalf of their daughters. As Karen Blumenthal says in her book, Title IX: The Law That Changed the Future of Girls in America: Congress passed the law that opened doors for girls and women in school and sports, and the government was charged with enforcing it. But the secret weapons in the fight for fairness was dads. The generation of girls born in the...

Here is the latest round up of interesting things to check out that are happening at the intersection of sports, film, culture and politics. Enjoy! Watch Edges, the award-winning 9-minute short film about 90-year-old ice skater, Yvonne Dowlen. Jump on your bicycle and ride along with Ayesha McGowan’s "Do Better Together" Virtual Ride Series + get a chance to win a new bike. Subscribe to The Relish, the juicy newsletter that serves up sports for the female fan. Rent (or better yet, buy) Quit Your Day Job, the first full length female skate film in the US in over a decade. Read (and watch) this gorgeous multimedia article about prima ballerina Misty Copeland’s trip to Cuba to represent female athleticism (yes, athleticism.) Order this art print of all the women who won gold medals at the Rio Olympics (and London, too.) Apply for this Marketing Internship with the girls action sports team at MAHFIA.TV Join No Bull Sports,...

“I am asking you to believe.  Not in my ability to bring about change – but in yours.” President Barack Obama, Farewell Address, 01.10.17 While a sold-out audience watched T-Rex: Her Fight for Gold in Theater 1 on opening night of the inaugural Women Sports Film Festival, history was unfolding in Theater 2 with the broadcast of Hillary Clinton accepting the Democratic Party’s nomination for President of the United States. Though we won't be inaugurating our first woman president next Friday in Washington, DC, hundreds of thousands will be gathering the following day for the Women’s March on Washington to send a bold message to our new government on their first day in office that women’s rights are human rights. Now, more than ever, we are committed to promoting and celebrating the stories of female athletes from around the world.  Our second annual film festival returns to Oakland on September 28-30, 2017 with...